The distributional effects of a carbon tax: The role of income inequality

The fact that a carbon tax is an environmentally and economically efficient instrument for reducing emissions is often highlighted, but the equity story is also of importance. This paper addresses the question of the distributional burden of a carbon tax across different income groups and the role played by income inequality.


Climate and disaster risk insurance in low income countries: Reflections on the importance of indicators and frameworks for monitoring performance and impact

How to effectively monitor and evaluate the use of climate and disaster risk insurance remains unclear. This paper reviews how these instruments are currently evaluated and finds a need for transparent monitoring and evaluation frameworks to enable greater scrutiny and to assist those funding, demanding or supplying insurance, with evidence from India and Africa.



Trust, temperature fluctuations, and asylum applications

This paper studies the relationship between generalised trust in other members in society, temperature fluctuations during the maize growing season, and international migration by asylum seekers, asking whether trust mitigates or increases the impact of climate change on migration.




Emissions trading with transaction costs

The authors of this paper develop a theoretical model of emissions trading in the presence of transaction costs, calibrating the model to annual transactions and compliance data in the European Union emissions trading scheme over its second phase.



Disaster impacts and financing: local insights from the Philippines

The Philippines is highly exposed to natural hazards including typhoons. This report, finding that financial aid tends to be heavily focused on response to hazards rather than preparedness and resilience, investigates why further disaster risk policy intervention may be required at the local level and provides guidance to policymakers. read more »


Market failures and willingness-to-accept the smart energy transition: Experimental evidence from the UK

This paper describes an experiment on a nationally representative sample of UK households that aimed to quantify resistance to smart meter adoption and test for the existence of commonly cited market failures that inhibit the adoption of energy-saving technologies. The authors measured if households would adopt a smart meter without financial compensation and, for those households unwilling to do so, the subsidy level that would be necessary to persuade them. read more »