Publications



What does an EU Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism mean for the UK?

Policy publication by Josh Burke, Misato Sato, Charlotte Taylor, Fangmin Li on 1 Apr 2021

There has been a resurgence in the debate around Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanisms (CBAMs) and the role they may play in preserving the effectiveness of climate action in high ambition countries. This report explores how the European Union’s CBAM, announced to come into force by the end of 2022, might affect the UK.



The impact of energy prices on socioeconomic and environmental performance: Evidence from French manufacturing establishments, 1997–2015

Working paper by Giovanni Marin, Francesco Vona on 17 Dec 2019

In evaluating the responses of French manufacturing firms to large increases in energy prices, which the authors use as a proxy for stringent environmental policy, they find that costs in terms of job losses and competitiveness are smaller by an order of magnitude than the benefits in terms of reducing carbon dioxide emissions. read more »



Global lessons for the UK in carbon taxes

Policy publication by Josh Burke, Rebecca Byrnes, Sam Fankhauser on 2 Aug 2019

This policy brief analyses global trends in carbon taxation and differences in tax design around the world to draw out lessons for the design of a possible new carbon tax for the UK, as the country plans how to meet its ambitious new net-zero emissions target and how it prices carbon after Brexit. read more »



The global consumer incidence of carbon pricing: evidence from trade

Working paper by Lutz Sager on 4 Apr 2019

This paper estimates the global distribution of the costs to consumers from carbon pricing, finding that some policies may be considered regressive for their burden on poorer consumers – but that the benefits from mitigating climate change may weaken or reverse the regressive effect. read more »


Steering the climate system: an extended comment

Working paper by Linus Mattauch, Richard Millar, Frederick van der Ploeg, Armon Rezai, Anselm Schultes, Frank Venmans, Nico Bauer, Simon Dietz, Ottmar Edenhofer, Niall Farrell, Cameron Hepburn, Gunnar Luderer, Jacquelyn Pless, Fiona Spuler, Nicholas Stern, Alexander Teytelboym on 4 Jan 2019

The authors of this comment respond to a recent argument put forward by Lemoine and Rudik (2017), that it is efficient to delay reducing carbon emissions because there is substantial inertia in the climate system. Mattauch et al. show that there is no such inertia, which means there is no lag between carbon emissions and warming. read more »